A Loyal Spy

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A Loyal Spy

Why I wrote A Loyal Spy

Facts behind the fiction

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Miranda's clues

 

 

A Loyal Spy

Facts behind the fiction

Iraq - systems sabotage is easy...

‘You’re going to blow it?’
‘Of course I am,’ Nor replied. ‘Identify and attack key enemy vulnerabilities. That’s what I’ve been talking about. That’s what I do. I blow things up. I fuck with the system. I spend a lot of time thinking up new ways to do it.’ A Loyal Spy
During the summer of 2004, a small group of insurgents blew up a southern section of the Iraqi oil pipeline infrastructure.
'The explosion was easy to set. The location they chose was safe, far from the motley collection of Iraqi forces and private contractors dedicated to the protection of Iraq's oil infrastructure. Their maps were highly accurate and showed exactly which pipeline, buried in a maze of others, was the critical one they wanted. They had only to dig a six-foot hole in the sandy soil, place the charges, and hit the ignition switch. The explosion itself wasn't even that large, but it was more than sufficient to burst the shell of the forty-eight-inch high-pressure oil line. Immediately, a flood of oil poured from the rupture, forming a small pool. Twenty-four hours later, with over 370,000 barrels of oil a day to draw from in the pipe, the pool had grown into a vast black lake overlaid with fetid fumes.' Brave New War by John Robb
The attack cost an estimated $2,000 while the explosion cost Iraq $500 million in lost oil exports - a rate of return 250,000 times the cost of the attack.
‘An attack on systems can magnify the effect of a small attack into a major event,’ Nor explained, his fingers tracing lines across the map. ‘Provided that we can identify a key enemy weakness, a small cell like ours, with minimal costs, can accomplish an attack that generates a rate of return that it is out all proportion to the initial investment.' A Loyal Spy